Friendship

Happy 40th Birthday to Dr. Santresa Glass

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

With the arrival of a new decade of life, one has a valuable opportunity to reflect deeply on the previous decade. As humans, we have undesirable experiences. We often bemoan those experiences. Unfortunately, we don’t devote enough time to auspicious experiences. Although everyone needs to wrestle properly with disappointing experiences, as I penned in “Don’t Let Disappointment Defeat You,” published by The Good Men Project, we should dedicate much more time to thinking about the good, those things, those experiences, those people who have helped us to simply be. Dr. Glass, thank you for being an example of resilience, for modeling and championing a version of what it means to simply be.

As I told you a few years ago, we all need to ask ourselves daily this essential question: “How you be?” Thank you for checking on “how you be.” Thank you for checking on me to ensure that I see “how I be.”

What your previous decade of life has taught me about you is you really care about those you love. You really care. I say this not because I’m surprised; I say this because of how you care for others and how you care for me grows more and more intense.

Although our love for one another has become a sister-brother relationship, I never want to discard the “friend” label—and “best friend” label. Why not? Because it’s important for me to employ how you do friendship to push back against those antithetical versions of “friendship” that, to be transparent, make me cynical sometimes about friendship. When I think of you, and our friendship, that cynicism retreats.

What do I know for sure about you? You’re my constant. What else do I know for sure about you? You’re a horrible singer—without question. Lmbo!

Even though this COVID-19 pandemic has made things less than ideal, to say the least, let today be a day of more than celebration; let it be a day of critical reflection, an ode to gratitude.

Reflect on the good of the past decade. What did you learn from the past decade? What did the past decade prove to you that you value? What can you take from the past decade to add fuel to this new decade of life?

Thank you for being my friend. Thank you for being my best friend. Thank you for being you.

Again, have an awesome day of celebration and critical reflection.

You’re old. I’m young and amazing. You’re old and kinda amazing. Okay, okay, okay, you’re amazing, too (sorta). Lmbo!

Happy 40th Birthday!

Love ya,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Happy 39th Birthday to Dr. Santresa L. Glass

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Santresa L. Glass

As you continue to celebrate life, including your own life, I wanted to take a brief moment and wish you a Happy Birthday! I’m so grateful to have you as a best friend. In fact, you’ve become more than a best friend; you’re my sister.

Through you, I’ve learned what a true best friend is and what one is not.

Thank you for being you and thank you for teaching me so much about authentic love and friendship.

Have the greatest day!

Love ya,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Happy 38th Birthday to Dr. Santresa Glass

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

(Photo courtesy of Dr. Santresa L. Glass)

Although you’re hoping that this will be the year I propose to you, don’t hold your breath; that’s never going to happen. Your endless and undesired pursuit of me is becoming, to be frank, frightening. I have repeatedly told you that I have no interest in an intimate relationship with you, but you don’t seem to get it. Some people never learn, though. You will have to settle for fantasizing about me using the limited pictures of me available.

Now that we are clear about those things, hopefully, I want this to be your best year. For the remainder of the year, invest more in yourself, in your dreams and aspirations. Before we can pour into others, we need our cups to be full—and running over—which permits us to give freely. When our cups are running over, this means we have so much to give to others—without taking from what we need. Others have benefited greatly from your giving, your kindness, your thoughtfulness. The time has come for you to show yourself gratitude. You are worth it!

Random note: I hate the Falcons! #RiseDown

So, this very discursive piece is my attempt to let you know I love you and that I’m grateful that God has gifted (and cursed—lol!) me with you for another year. Without question, it’s a blessing (and cursing—lol!) to have you as a best friend. What I love the most about you—besides your wholesomeness—is your ratchetness. And you know how much I love women with a perfect blend of class and ratchetness (i.e. Joseline Hernandez and Keyshia Cole).

Well, get ready for these songs I’m about to sing to you! It’s about to go down! A concert.

As Jack would say, “And now, a song.”

Love ya,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Happy 37th Birthday to Dr. Santresa L. Glass

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

(Photo Courtesy of Dr. Santresa L. Glass)

Most friends speak about they’ve had their “ups and downs” as friends, but we’ve never experienced any “downs.” For 16 years, you’ve been one of my best friends, and I’m grateful for our incomparable friendship. Too many people wait until someone’s funeral before sharing expressions of love, but we make our love for one another known weekly, even if it’s just a “love you” text. You’re undeniably beautiful on the inside and outside.

I’m so proud of all you have accomplished. When I think about the fact that my best friend is a pioneer in research on social media’s impact on small and medium-sized businesses, completing one of the earliest doctoral dissertations in this area, this makes me even more proud of you. I look forward to the future research you will conduct and publish in this area, and I look forward to collaborating with you on some empirical studies involving this interesting and important research.

The great work you’re doing through your non-profit organization, Cheesecake For The Cure, Inc., is commendable. Each day, your organization, under your leadership, works tirelessly to bring increased awareness about all forms of cancer—not just one or two forms as almost all other cancer-related organizations do. Again, you’re innovative and revolutionary approach to cancer prevention, education, support and treatment makes you a standout leader and thinker in this sector of the non-profit community. I’m intrigued to see what Cheesecake For The Cure, Inc. will do next. By the way, I hate cancer! (You already knew that, though.)

My prayer for you, on your 37th birthday, is to have a day of joy, peace, relaxation and reflection.

Without question, you’re one of the best gifts God has ever given to me.

Thank you for being who you are.

I love you.

Grace and Peace,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Santresa Glass Celebrates 36 Years of Life

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

Happy birthday to one of my best friends, Dr. Santresa Lolita Glass! Yes, I wrote your whole name. And, if you don’t like it, I can revise the previous sentence to include your other names, names that are more apt fits: stalker, for example. Just let me know. On to even more important things, though, I want you to have an excellent birthday; one that is filled with joy, relaxation and peace. With such a great heart, you deserve only the best. Unfortunately, that great heart will never make me desire you—don’t get it twisted sweetie. (I know how much you despise being called “sweetie,” especially from a certain group of people, but that’s another story.)

For the remainder of the year, just breathe, just live.

I’m so fortunate to have you as a best friend. When a person is loved by you, he or she is blessed with authentic love. You love your friends and family genuinely—not for what they can give you or do for you. Always know that your life has tremendous value; it touches, affects and makes the difference for numerous people.

You matter. What you do matters. What you say matters. What you think matters.

Too often, people take for granted the ability to be a true friend. This ability is a gift from Jesus. Having a real friend is a gift from God, and being able to be a real friend is a gift from God. No matter what anyone says, know that you possess the gift of friendship—in both forms.

As I continue to live this wonderful life in Christ Jesus, I learn that the untrustworthy and selfish people in my life will inevitably be exposed. Just recently, I discovered someone I long supported, devoted time and energy to, and loved demonstrated pure selfishness and deceit. With you, San, I never have to concern myself with such foolishness. You’re never thinking about how you can take advantage of someone to fulfill your selfish longings.

Thank you for being a giver. Thank you for being kind. Thank you for being selfless. Thank you for being my friend.

Well, I’ve wasted enough of my day on you—valuable time that I’ll never be able to redeem. You’re not that special to consume so much of my time. Duh!

Understand that I’ll never want you—no matter how many creative advances you try to make—I’ll never desire you. You’re simply obsessed with me and, at this point, it has become really pathetic.

Anyway, have the best birthday ever and know that I love you—not like you want—but with the love one of the best friends in the world deserves!

P.S. Although I will not have time today to give you a live concert, just know in the days to come you will be blessed with the gift of mellifluous, yoke-destroying, harmonious, and chart-topping song.

Love ya,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels (your wildest fantasy)

University of Wisconsin-Madison