The Beauty of Restraint

Photo Credit: Imgur

Although you may be an unfiltered person, one who holds nothing back, takes no prisoners, add one powerful tool to your arsenal: restraint. Even though it may seem counterintuitive, take some opportunities to exercise restraint when folks will not expect you to filter yourself or remain silent. If something is said, especially if well-planned, orchestrated by one or more individuals, that would normally ignite your metaphorical fire, shock people occasionally by responding to their mean-spirited, intentionally injurious words with silence or a filtered, understated retort. When you’re known for bringing the metaphorical heat, you can keep your opponents dazed and confused by sometimes responding in ways much less vigorous than is typical. Don’t let people easily anticipate you and your response; add some mystery, some deeper nuance, some extra layers to you and your reactions.

Trust me, I understand how difficult this can be. Recently, I was reminded how challenging this is for someone who doesn’t “play no games,” but, after robust reflection, I saw how my restraint confounded my adversaries. Even if your detractors think they have defeated you with their well-designed takedown, one analogous to those Vice President Kamala Harris deftly delivers, withhold your raw response—at least temporarily.

Let them wonder when you will bring the heat to them. I know you’re probably saying, “My enemies will think their comments went over my head.” That’s okay; let them think this. Let them think you’re not as tough as once thought. Wait until the opportune time, especially a time when they are no longer thinking about what they said, and then verbally annihilate them.

To employ this strategy, you must see the beauty of restraint. Restraint doesn’t mean allowing yourself to be slaughtered. Not at all! You’re actually bamboozling and hoodwinking them. They will not discover it until it’s too late.

If you’re not willing to be vulnerable, then this strategy will not work. In fact, you will not even take a necessary leap of faith to employ it.

Take a leap of faith. Strengthen your metaphorical firepower with occasional restraint. Win more battles and wars—win them more decisively.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison            

Happy 41st Birthday, Dr. Santresa L. Glass!

Dr. Santresa L. Glass
Dr. Santresa L. Glass

Walking briskly and robustly, every single step, every single movement infused with purpose, seeming to own every particle composing the pavement and hallways treaded on the illustrious campus of Albany State University, San, as I affectionately call her, made her presence known—not vociferously—but by permitting her natural fierceness to shine. To be frank, as I would watch her walk—with that big ole booty—I would say to myself, “That girl is mean; she is not to be messed with; she walks like she owns the ground.” Guess what? I loved everything I saw, though.

Much to my surprise, she walked into the same classroom I was sitting. Our first course together, “Literary Forms,” taught by Ms. Laverne Luster, who retired after over twenty-five years of teaching at Albany State University, was the first English major course we shared. While students were waiting on Ms. Luster to arrive, they were engaged in typical small talk. Some students familiar with my radical history at the institution, a history that aroused the praise of many and caused others to see me as “crazy,” “weird,” and/or “dangerous,” were joking with me about some things I did and said in the past.

As San was listening, she started chuckling at what she was hearing. This was the first time I saw her smile; it was a beautiful, endearing, and disarming smile. She joined the conversation, and this launched a long friendship—like none other.

This friendship with San, now Dr. Santresa Lolita Glass (yes, the whole government name, shawty!), has resulted in her stalking me, mesmerized by my indubitable handsomeness. Lmbo! Although I cannot blame her, she must understand I have eternally placed her in the “friend’s zone.”

Life’s barriers and toxic missiles have been unsuccessful in taking you out. One thing I know you know for sure, to borrow from Auntie Oprah Winfrey, is you can endure and conquer anything that comes your way. That’s your superpower, and it has been a blessing to see you exercise it since the time we met at the renowned and unsinkable Albany State University to the present moment.  

Keep forging ahead! Keep pounding pavement and hallways! Keep being great!

Happy 41st Birthday, Dr. Santresa Lolita Glass!

Love,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison     

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels Celebrates 40 Years of Life: Ruminations and Revelations

Yesterday, March 27, 2021, was my 40th birthday. To live this long, I am grateful, grateful for God’s grace. Without God’s grace, I wouldn’t have made it to see my 40th birthday. This pandemic has reaffirmed how important it is to value your life, to see how precious it is, to see how much of a blessing it is.

We have a responsibility to God to steward the time He has bestowed. For 40 years, I tried to make the most of my time. Unfortunately, I haven’t been flawless in this endeavor. Why? Because I permitted other people, people unworthy of holding space with, unworthy of occupying my time, to rob me of the power of maximizing each minute, each moment. I want to acknowledge the missteps and the poor choices I’ve made regarding using my time. Why? To make change happen, one must first recognize and then analyze his or her past mistakes, mistakes that prevented optimal progress.

After ruminating about past mistakes, imprudent decisions, one must focus on life ahead of him or her. That’s what I’m determined to do. Too many of us choose to be consumed by regret and to wallow in past misfortunes. To be frank, though, if we’re going to live in the past, then we don’t really have any use for the present. By dwelling in and on the past, we’re making the same deleterious mistake of the past that haunts our present: we’re wasting our time.

Don’t waste your time. Your time is sacred; God has given it to you.

I will not waste another minute, another moment, on people and things that shouldn’t occupy my time and space. I promise myself and God that, from this day forward, I will use every minute on living, loving, learning, growing, and doing the work.

For so many of my past 40 years, I couldn’t distinguish between helping people and self-mutilation. How did I finally recognize that my “helping” of some unworthy people was self-mutilation? I finally realized and admitted that my scars and wounds bear their names.  

Scars don’t magically disappear; wounds don’t magically heal. What can change immediately, however, is your relationship to those scars and wounds. You can refuse to be defined by those scars and wounds, and you can refuse to remain in those dark places where they originated.

The scars and wounds have strengthened me, and I am ready to live in the power of the possibilities available to me.

Live. Love. Learn. Laugh. Grow. Conquer.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Expose Fake Justice Activism

Photo Credit: UC Santa Barbara

Much to my dismay, I often find the most visible and vociferous voices advocating for justice on social media are inauthentic and milquetoast voices. These folks are primarily interested in people clapping for them and amassing the most “likes,” “loves,” and retweets on social media. While they’re known for employing fiery, robust rhetoric, they refuse to speak truth to power to racists and White supremacists, including to those who employ them. Many of these disingenuous justice activists pose as radicals but are unwilling to embrace and engage in radical praxis and politics.

To embrace and engage in radical praxis and politics necessitates alacrity for risking something valuable for the cause of justice, including losing one’s employment. If you’re unwilling to risk losing your job or career for the cause of justice, then your justice activism is a farce—it’s ultimately about self-promotion, self-aggrandizement.

Those of us truly committed to authentic justice activism and radical praxis and politics need to be just as visible and vociferous in our critique of their ersatz activism. This phony justice activism threatens true justice activism, fooling many that it’s real and needs replicating. As someone who has taught English at the middle and high school and university levels for over twenty years, I love the power of words, the gift of language. To realize radical transformation in America, to see racial, social, economic, educational justice materialize, we need more genuine radical activism, activism centering transformative actions—not self-indulgent, attention-seeking tweets and Facebook posts.

Real justice activists must expose those posing as justice activists on social media by asking them some important questions: (1) What have you risked for the cause of justice?, (2) What have you lost for the cause of justice?, and (3) What transformative actions have you taken and are taking for the cause of justice? These questions will unsettle and unnerve phonies, but, more importantly, these queries will unmask their vacuous messages.

Authenticity needs defending. When it’s not, truth becomes distorted, and we fall down a slippery slope of normalizing deceit.

As an increasing number of people are engaging in false justice activism, we must recognize they are enemies of justice. Although fake justice activists aren’t in the same camp as racists and White supremacists, they hinder meaningful progress in similar ways. The next time, therefore, you see a phony posing as a justice activist, expose him or her.

Call out those working in the interest of racism and White supremacy—even when they pretend their self-promoting social media messages further the cause of justice.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

John Calipari’s Arrogant 2020-2021 Scheduling

Can Coach John Calipari Survive the Alaskan Frontier? The Kilchers Put Him  to the Test! | Alaska: The Last Frontier | Discovery
Courtesy of Discovery

As of Christmas Eve, December 24, 2020, the Kentucky Wildcats have the worst record in SEC basketball. Although the team has played the most competitive non-conference schedule in the conference, the Wildcats are statistically, based on wins and losses, the worst team in the conference, beginning with a 1-5 record. One must go back to the 1926-1927 season to find a time when the Wildcats had such a pitiful record.

The Arkansas Razorbacks have the top team in the SEC. An average Kentucky fan says, “Arkansas has played nobody.” The average Arkansas fan retorts, “Kentucky has beaten nobody.”

Why did John Calipari give Kentucky such a hyper-competitive non-conference schedule?

The brief answer is he’s arrogant.

Even though John Calipari attempted to defend his scheduling decisions, asserting that people will criticize him no matter what he does, it either evinces ignorance or arrogance. His years of proven success demonstrate he’s not ignorant. I’m left with the conclusion that he’s arrogant, however. Why?

Calipari has scheduled seven games preceding the rigorous SEC schedule that include Richmond (losing 76-64), Kansas (losing 65-62), Georgia Tech (losing 79-62), Notre Dame (losing 64-63), North Carolina (losing 75-63), and Louisville (scheduled for Saturday at Louisville).

With such a non-conference schedule, Calipari believes he has the best or one of the best teams in the nation. Well, at 1-5, the Wildcats are not the best team in the nation. We still have a long season to go, so we will see if the Wildcats prove to be one of the best teams in the nation. In a pandemic where Covid-19 protocols prevent teams from operating normally, you don’t create a non-conference schedule like this unless you’re arrogant. Although Calipari recruits a top-ranked class each year, he loses players to the NBA each year, thus resulting in his team lacking stability and the prior year’s ability.

Recognizing he must lead a team of new and young talented players, John Calipari imprudently elected to give them one of the nation’s toughest schedules. This young team doesn’t have any remaining cupcakes on the schedule, considering it encounters the SEC schedule after the game at Louisville. Due to Covid-19 protocols, the home game scheduled for December 29, 2020, against South Carolina is postponed.

The team will travel to Starkville, Mississippi, to battle with Mississippi State, Kentucky’s first SEC game. After this grueling opening schedule, the team is starting on the road against Mississippi State University. Whew!

Kentucky will play Texas later in the season, further evidencing how brutal its non-conference schedule is.  

This team will lose at least five more games, which will mean the mighty Kentucky Wildcats will finish the regular season with at least ten defeats. Kentucky fans can thank John Calipari.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison  

Don’t Let Leaders and Activists Dupe You

Duped

Photo Credit: One Hundred Hearts

When trying to lead a righteous movement or advocate for a noble cause, one must have an authentic commitment to truth and justice. You cannot have a genuine commitment to justice if you’re not willing to tell the whole truth, which includes the whole truth about yourself—not just the whole truth about others. It’s easy to tell the truth about others, to expose others, but never forget to give a full account of your truth. Although in this moment of “alternative facts” it may seem that truth and truth-telling don’t matter, they still do. In fact, they’re more important than ever. Those calling themselves leaders and social justice activists have an obligation to tell those they’re leading the whole truth—even when it’s unsettling.

One way to know if someone has integrity is to learn what he or she does in private. Most of the time, of course, we cannot know what people do in private. When they engage in corruption in private, however, that corruption has a way of telling the truth on them in public. Once we discover their corruption, we shouldn’t immediately attempt to justify them and/or their corruption. We have to hold our leaders and social justice activists accountable.

Never deify a human being.

Before you place too much investment in leaders and social justice activists, do the work necessary to gain an understanding of who they really are. Don’t just listen to a few of their speeches. Don’t just attend a few of their rallies. Don’t just look at their nice physical appearance. Research them, ask them probing questions, and discern their values and principles.

Yes, no man or woman is perfect, but do your due diligence to discover if a leader and/or activist you support truly aligns with your values and principles.

If you find out that a leader or activist you support has a record of committing fraudulent acts, will you continue to trust this person? Yes, the person may have engaged in these acts years ago, but was he or she honest with you about past wrongs? When people have committed certain wrongs, no matter how long ago they happened, those misdeeds may warrant reassessing your connection to them. You can value their productive work, but when you continue to lend your support to corrupt people—and “stand by your man or woman”—you become complicit in their corruption.

Integrity is telling the truth when it hurts. Integrity is telling the truth when it may cast you in an undesirable light. Integrity is not misleading people about who you are. Integrity is not permitting people to advertise you as someone you aren’t.

Understand this: If a person does not have integrity, he or she isn’t committed to justice. Why? Because integrity and justice are inextricably linked.

We all have a responsibility to hold ourselves accountable to honoring truth and justice. We all fail truth and justice when we allow people we have exalted, placed on a pedestal, to trample on truth and justice. If we’re willing to let these people lie to us, then we have to question our own commitment to truth and justice.

Ethical principles should reign supreme over unhealthy ties to people.

Closely examine the leaders and social justice activists you support and determine if they’re holding firmly to the values and principles you desire them to maintain. If you discover they aren’t who you thought they were, and aren’t principled individuals, then don’t foolishly continue to lend your support to them.

Make wise decisions about who and what you elect to champion.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Understanding the George Floyd Uprisings

George Floyd Protests

Photo Credit: Al Jazeera

Too many whites and, unfortunately, too many blacks are communicating that they don’t understand why many protests emerging after the lynching of George Floyd by corrupt white police officer Derek Chauvin—with lethal assistance from three other evil police officers, Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng, and Tou Thao—in Minneapolis, Minnesota, feature some rioting, looting, violence, and significant property damage. These whites and blacks assert that they don’t see the purpose of such licentiousness, especially since, from their collective perspective, this will not resurrect George Floyd. In this piece, I offer clarity about some of the reasoning that informs illicit elements of the George Floyd uprisings.

This will, therefore, disabuse folks of the argument that the uprisings lack purpose. Although one may disagree with unlawful elements of these uprisings, once a rationale is divulged, one cannot genuinely say that the criminal acts are meaningless; one can oppose the meaning offered, but future attempts to claim these uprisings are bereft of purpose will be intellectually disingenuous.

The George Floyd uprisings signal a national and global flowering of resistance to the vicious and enduring legacies of racism, white supremacy, Jim and Jane Crow, poverty, and militarism that the Black Lives Matter Movement (BLM), an organic and revolutionary citizens’, including global citizens, movement for racial, social, economic, and educational justice, has initiated. To be clear, these uprisings are part of the BLM.

Is Peaceful Protesting Possible?

Although most in the BLM are peaceful, non-violent people, they are fighting for peace. They are protesting the absence of peace in America. This dearth of peace does not make “peaceful protesting,” as traditionally conceived, possible. When so many racists, especially those who can employ state power against blacks, are unwilling to recognize black humanity, blacks and their allies cannot “peacefully protest”—if by “peacefully protest” one means asking for equity, freedom, and justice.

If you’re black, it’s futile to ask racists, especially those capable of using state power, for anything. They don’t see and hear you. What most of us in the BLM are doing isn’t asking anyone for anything; we’re demanding equity, freedom, and justice. For blacks and other ethnic minorities, we can never have peace in America until we force America to see and hear us.

America can never be a nation of peace until she’s compelled.

See and Hear Black People

While rioting, looting, and violence develop sometimes during demonstrations by those in the BLM, although these prohibited acts are primarily done by opportunists, individuals and organizations unconnected to the BLM, blacks are now being seen and heard. Racists and whites who are not allies of those in the BLM are feeling unsafe and experiencing significant financial wounds due to property damage and loss.

Whites see and hear blacks when they feel unsafe and have their money seriously affected.

The George Floyd uprisings are forcing the nation and world to see and hear black people.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Explained Rioting

In “The Other America,” a speech delivered at Stanford University, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., contended:

“I think America must see that riots do not develop out of thin air. Certain conditions continue to exist in our society which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots. But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last few years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity. And so in a real sense our nation’s summers of riots are caused by our nation’s winters of delay. And as long as America postpones justice, we stand in the position of having these recurrences of violence and riots over and over again. Social justice and progress are the absolute guarantors of riot prevention.”

If you don’t like “riots,” then radically change the “certain conditions” that “continue to exist in our society which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots.” For whites and blacks who don’t understand why some are resorting to rioting, looting, violence, and general lawlessness, remember Dr. King’s powerful words: “…a riot is the language of the unheard.” King let us know what America has not heard from the unheard: its poverty and denied freedom and justice.

Also, I want to accentuate, as it is critical to those lacking comprehension about why some are engaging in rioting, looting, violence, and general lawlessness, Dr. King’s point about how many whites have failed to recognize that they are more concerned about peace and the status quo than justice, equality and humanity: “And it [America] has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity.”

Dr. King ultimately indicted America, white America, as responsible for the “certain conditions that continue to exist” that promote rioting: “And so in a real sense our nation’s summers of riots are caused by our nation’s winters of delay. And as long as America postpones justice, we stand in the position of having these recurrences of violence and riots over and over again.”

If you want the rioting to end, then implement Dr. King’s solution: “Social justice and progress are the absolute guarantors of riot prevention.”

While Dr. King joined white America’s advocacy for peace (“tranquility”), he desired for white America to be just as committed to justice, equality, and humanity. Too many whites, however, have failed to heed this message.

Black People Have Had Enough 

George Floyd is the latest example of how it has always been “open season” on blacks in America. An increasing number of white police officers are heinously and senselessly killing blacks in public and private space. And black people and their allies have had enough.

Again, we’ve had enough.

We’re showing you we’ve had enough.

We’ve been tired of white folks killing us, including at the hands of white police officers, but you, white America, are beginning to feel just how tired we are.

Too many black bodies have been murdered by white police officers and white people in general. No one has been held accountable for most of the black blood on their white blood-stained hands.

If you don’t like what you’re witnessing, then become a part of the change, radical transformation America needs.

The Dawning of a New America

A beautiful multi-ethnic national and global coalition demanding equity and justice for all is rising; you see it in your streets and on your televisions.

America will become a more just, more equitable, more peaceful nation, and the revolution that will engender this radical transformation will, in part, be televised, tweeted, and shared on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Happy 40th Birthday to Dr. Santresa Glass

Dr. Santresa L. Glass

With the arrival of a new decade of life, one has a valuable opportunity to reflect deeply on the previous decade. As humans, we have undesirable experiences. We often bemoan those experiences. Unfortunately, we don’t devote enough time to auspicious experiences. Although everyone needs to wrestle properly with disappointing experiences, as I penned in “Don’t Let Disappointment Defeat You,” published by The Good Men Project, we should dedicate much more time to thinking about the good, those things, those experiences, those people who have helped us to simply be. Dr. Glass, thank you for being an example of resilience, for modeling and championing a version of what it means to simply be.

As I told you a few years ago, we all need to ask ourselves daily this essential question: “How you be?” Thank you for checking on “how you be.” Thank you for checking on me to ensure that I see “how I be.”

What your previous decade of life has taught me about you is you really care about those you love. You really care. I say this not because I’m surprised; I say this because of how you care for others and how you care for me grows more and more intense.

Although our love for one another has become a sister-brother relationship, I never want to discard the “friend” label—and “best friend” label. Why not? Because it’s important for me to employ how you do friendship to push back against those antithetical versions of “friendship” that, to be transparent, make me cynical sometimes about friendship. When I think of you, and our friendship, that cynicism retreats.

What do I know for sure about you? You’re my constant. What else do I know for sure about you? You’re a horrible singer—without question. Lmbo!

Even though this COVID-19 pandemic has made things less than ideal, to say the least, let today be a day of more than celebration; let it be a day of critical reflection, an ode to gratitude.

Reflect on the good of the past decade. What did you learn from the past decade? What did the past decade prove to you that you value? What can you take from the past decade to add fuel to this new decade of life?

Thank you for being my friend. Thank you for being my best friend. Thank you for being you.

Again, have an awesome day of celebration and critical reflection.

You’re old. I’m young and amazing. You’re old and kinda amazing. Okay, okay, okay, you’re amazing, too (sorta). Lmbo!

Happy 40th Birthday!

Love ya,

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Everybody Doesn’t Want You

Flirting

Photo Credit: Getty

If someone jokes around with you, it doesn’t necessarily mean the person is seeking an intimate relationship with you—even if the jokes are sexual. When an individual gives you a compliment, it doesn’t necessarily mean he or she desires an intimate relationship with you. People helping you out of the goodness of their heart aren’t looking for sexual favors in return; in fact, when they’re truly doing it out of the goodness of their heart, they’re not looking for anything in return. When someone shows you some attention, it doesn’t necessarily mean he or she wants you. If you believe any attention shown to you means someone wants you, then you need a serious wake-up call: you’re not irresistible. Don’t flatter yourself.

People can be so vain. Before you think someone is seriously flirting with you or pursuing you, ask him or her. If his or her jokes, playful flirting, compliments, and/or general interactions with you make you feel uncomfortable, tell him or her.

You should, however, gain a proper understanding of why you feel uncomfortable in the first place. Could you feel uncomfortable because you actually like what the person is saying and/or doing and you don’t know what to do with your own feelings? Try to understand your own feelings before you attempt to comprehend someone else’s.

Yes, people can employ jokes, playful flirting, compliments, and their general helpfulness to mask their true intentions. Even if they are doing this, are you being harmed? If you feel they are creepy, then let them know you want them to stop. You have that right.

Don’t make a big fuss about nothing, though. Stop creating problems where no problems exist.

Get over yourself.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Faking Happiness Makes Your Unhappiness Transparent

Trying to fool people you’re happy when you’re not is a self-sabotaging practice; you’re deceiving nobody and denying yourself time, space, and opportunities to heal and grow. Ostentatious displays of imaginary “happiness,” especially following tragedy or heartbreak, does not reveal true happiness: it exposes your cowardice, your unwillingness to sit with the pain, the heartache you’re confronting.

Even though the pain of tragedy or heartbreak is unsettling, one should never resort to facades, misrepresentations. Sit with your pain in private first, and when you’ve given yourself the proper time, space, and opportunities to heal and grow, then you can publicly share your authentic happiness or demonstrable progress towards it.

Loss, betrayal, dishonesty—all dimensions of the human condition we face. How we respond to them determines how we emerge from them. Do you want to emerge more liberated, more empowered from them, or do you want to live imprisoned in self-doubt, eternally vexed by your toxic response to them?

Fake it until you make it—a vain, otiose philosophy—spoils any chance you have to advance beyond unhappiness. In fact, this fallacious and disingenuous philosophy is rooted in unhappiness.

You cannot experience emancipation when you’re committed to shackling yourself to unhappiness. The previous sentence evokes Audre Lorde’s powerful statement of resistance to enslaving one’s self to the control of an enemy: “The master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house.” Unhappiness cannot be eradicated with the tools of unhappiness.

In the midst of your storm, find hope, hope in what’s possible beyond the storm. The storm can be ephemeral; the storm can be surprisingly enriching. Your commitment to truth in the storm will lead you safely on the other side of it. On the side of the storm is joy, peace, and gratitude.

Joy is enduring and more fulfilling than happiness. To arrive usher in happiness, one must begin a serious gratitude praxis, a praxis that ultimately leads to joy.

When you embrace gratitude, a life of gratitude, you enjoy the beauty of life: you savor victories and effectively process disappointments. Disappointments are natural human experiences, but we should never live in fear of disappointments; we should live in expectation of one thing—the good.

A spirit that expects the good, found in the heart of a person committed to permitting herself or himself to receive the fruits of truth, love, and justice, is necessary to maintain joy and peace.

Allow nobody or anything to displace you from joy and peace.

Always remain honest with yourself.

Although in this late stage of capitalism, where Guy Debord’s notion of “the society of the spectacle” is decidedly more pronounced, you may feel compelled to project a phony public image, which leads you to becoming nothing more than a spectacle, love yourself enough to give the world your truth. If you’re not happy, then don’t display a happy facade.

Give the world your best—even if your best is a temporary period of unhappiness. The world knows you’re human; don’t try to be a robot, falling prey to self-deceit. 

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison