Writing

15 Non-Sexist Word or Phrase Substitutes

English teacher helping students

(Photo Credit: Reference)                            

When one writes with his or her reader or audience in mind, the individual employs non-sexist language. An awareness of non-sexist language communicates that you’re a careful, considerate writer. This piece offers 15 non-sexist word or phrase substitutes.

  1. Replace mankind with humanity.
  2. Replace policeman with police officer.
  3. Replace man-hours with work hours.
  4. Replace mailman with police officer.
  5. Replace chairman with chairperson.
  6. Replace a man who with someone who.
  7. Replace anchorman with anchor.
  8. Replace cleaning woman with domestic.
  9. Replace Englishmen with the English.
  10. Replace fireman with firefighter.
  11. Replace foreman with supervisor.
  12. Replace man-made with artificial or manufactured.
  13. Replace postman with mail carrier.
  14. Replace salesman with salesperson.
  15. Replace self-made man with self-made person.

Dr. Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

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7 Writing Tips for Communicating with Diverse Cultures

Business Writing

(Photo Credit: Christian Science Monitor)

When sending written communication to business professionals from a culture different than your own, familiarize yourself with their written communication preferences and acclimate your approach, style, and tone to meet their expectations.  The following is a list of 7 highly recommended tips to consider:

1. Use simple, clear language. Use precise words that don’t have the potential to confuse with multiple meanings.

2. Be brief. Use simple sentences and short paragraphs, breaking information into smaller chunks that are easier to capture and translate.

3. Use transitional elements. Using transitions from sentence to sentence and from paragraph to paragraph helps your writing to achieve the cohesion and clarity it needs.

4. Address international correspondences properly.

5. Cite numbers and dates carefully.

6. Avoid slang, idiomatic phrases, and business jargon. Mundane writing is full of slang and idiomatic phrases, phrases that mean more than the sum of all of their literal parts. Your readers may have no idea what you’re saying when you use idiomatic phrases.

7. Avoid humor and other references to popular culture. Jokes and references to popular culture usually rely on subtle cultural issues that might be completely unknown to one’s readers.

Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Introducing Me and My Blog’s Purpose

Hello, All:

My name is Antonio Maurice Daniels, Ph.D. student and Research Associate in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. My primary research interests are African-American male college student-athletes, African-American male students throughout the educational pipeline, and ecological sustainability in higher and postsecondary education.

For my first blog, I wanted to start with explaining the purpose of my blog. The purpose of my blog is to serve as an extension of my purpose in life: to unsettle, unnerve, and unhouse. This blog will be a venue for sharing information and ideas. If you are looking for discussions about serious issues, this will certainly be a place where you will be quite satisfied. I look forward to engaging with you on a constellation of diverse topics.

Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison