Career Choice

Find Your Passion: 3 Quick Career Transitions

Job satisfaction is a lost concept, at least according to 65 percent of workers in the U.S. and Canada who responded to a 2012 Right Management survey.  Nearly half of those surveyed, or 44 percent, were completely unsatisfied with their current positions; 21 percent were somewhat unsatisfied. Only 19 percent reported overall satisfaction.  If you’re in the majority that finds little to no joy on the job, it may be time to align your passions with your purpose and launch a new career.

Animal Lover

Your lifelong array of dogs, cats, rabbits and other pets may attest to your love of animals, and you can turn that love into a paycheck with a career helping animals.  The demand for veterinary assistants is expected to increase by 10 percent over the next 10 years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and you can join the ranks by launching a career in the field.

Photo by Animal Kingdom Pet Hospital via Flickr

Online institutions like Penn Foster offer diploma programs in veterinary studies, with the overall goal of readying you for a position as a veterinary assistant. Duties can include monitoring and caring for animals after surgery, preparing instruments and assisting with medication and emergency first aid.  An American Veterinary Medical Association survey reported a well-above-average satisfaction level for vets, and their assistants may enjoy a similar level of delight.

Design Junkie

If you’re accustomed to hearing great praise when people walk into your home and see what you’ve done with the place, you may be able to extend that talent to others with a career in interior design. Interior designers are a creative lot with flexible work choices. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports about 25 percent of interior designers were self-employed in 2012, and the field is expected to grow 13 percent over the next decade.

Photo by Rogue-Designs via Flickr

Gaining a strong understanding of the industry goes far beyond matching up throw pillows.  Buttress your innate talent and artistic eye with training in the field, which you can do in fewer than six months. You’ll then be armed with the knowledge about match lighting, colors and materials with space requirements and homeowners’ tastes.  A StudentsReview survey that polled interior design majors after graduation found more than half were satisfied with their line of work.

True Crime Buff

If your nightstand is stacked with nonfiction crime novels and the first news stories you read involve court cases, a hunch says you might enjoy a career in Criminal Justice.  A solid place to start is with an associate’s degree in the field, which can serve as a stepping stone into a variety of job choices.

Photo by Ban Spy via Flickr

A degree in Criminal Justice can supplement your existing knowledge of the court and corrections systems, outline how police management operates and even touch on theories of what makes people turn to crime.  Top it off with basics on the nature of crime, law and Criminal Justice and you’re ready to job hunt for local, state or even federal government jobs at USAJobs.gov.  While job growth in the field depends on the exact position you choose, a StudentsReview survey reported nearly 70 percent of Criminal Justice graduates were satisfied with their new jobs.

Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Professional Athletes Are Worthy of Their Pay

Black Athletes

Although many people think professional athletes make too much money, they deserve the money they earn.  Professional athletes provide professional team owners with the highest quality talent and skills available in the world for the positions they fill.  When you’re hiring the best available people in the world for the positions you have, those individuals are worthy of earning lucrative salaries.  Professional sports team owners are multi-billionaires who make billions more off of the athletes they employ.  Unfortunately, the significant income disparities between professional athletes and professional team owners are overlooked.  Many people see athletes making millions and fail to realize the owners are raking in billions by giving what’s pocket change to them to the athletes responsible for their continual prosperity.  Yes, many professional athletes are rich, especially baseball, basketball, and football players.  In comparison to money their team owners receive, these professional athletes are making minimum wages or less.

Deeply underlying many people’s arguments against professional athletes earning the lucrative salaries they collect is a racist critique of the perceived realities of the professional sports economy.  One of those racist critiques of the perceived realities of the professional sports economy is it’s leading to too many black male millionaires.  While black men are becoming millionaires in the professional sports economy, it does not compare to the way white men become millionaires in the larger national economy.  Many racists contend that the professional sports economy threatens to upset white economic dominance.  This is such a ridiculous racist postmodern anxiety.  The number of black males receiving million dollar salaries in the professional sports economy is analogous to throwing pebbles in a pond—the number is insignificant in comparison to the number of whites who are millionaires.  Many racists are simply uncomfortable with seeing a black millionaire, especially a black male millionaire.  They try to camouflage their racial hatred for black people by asserting that making millions for playing sports is unjustified.

Last month, Lebron James defended the many millions he makes as a professional basketball player.  Although he’s right in explaining why he deserves to be paid such a significant amount of money, it’s time to expose the racism, prejudice and unsubstantiated arguments offered by many who question the legitimacy of professional athletes earning multi-million dollar salaries.  One has to wonder would this be such a highly discussed topic if there weren’t a conspicuous number of black men getting multi-million dollar salaries to play professional sports.

Lebron James

Professional athletes have elected to devote themselves to careers in sports and their career choices should be respected as you desire to have your career choices respected.

Do you believe professional athletes make too much money?  Why or why not?

Antonio Maurice Daniels

University of Wisconsin-Madison